Around the world tour

Join us in circling the globe and touching down on the seven continents from the comfort of our homes. Watch LIVE cams to enter the real-time world of these wonderful and diverse places, and learn fascinating facts about each location. Because these cams are live, parental supervision is advised.

Golden Wheel Spider 

What animal is the best tumbler in the world? Check out the Golden wheel spider in the desert sands of Namibia! Its remarkable performance rivals the tumbling floor routine of any gymnast: rolling 44 revolutions per second!  

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Destination: Africa

  • The African continent, the world’s oldest populated area, is larger than the USA, Canada and India combined.

  • Known for its diversity and richness of wildlife, Africa has a greater variety of freshwater fish and hoofed mammals than any other continent. Over 85% of the world’s elephants and 99% of its lions live in Africa.

  • Bigger than the continental USA, the Sahara desert is the largest hot desert on earth.

  • Over 750,000 zebra and 1.2 million wildebeest migrate through the Serengeti National Park, the largest wildlife migration on the planet.

  • There are 54 countries and 9 territories in Africa.

  • 1.1 billion people (15% of the world's total population) call Africa home. Over 50% of its population are under the age of 25. The population is anticipated to more than double to 2.3 billion people by 2050.

  • In Africa, there are fewer people with internet connections than in New York City.

  • With the exceptions of Ethiopia and Liberia, all of Africa was colonized by foreign powers. Before colonial rule, Africa comprised up to 10,000 different states and autonomous groups with distinct languages and customs.

Situated in an area that was once the ancient ‘Ivory Route' linking Mozambique and Zululand, Tembe Elephant Park is renowned for having the largest elephants in Africa – and the planet! The park consists mainly of closed woodland but offers a great diversity of vegetation, lying within a transition area between tropical and sub-tropical forms.

Elephant facts:

  • African elephants are slightly larger than their Asian cousins, and can be identified by their larger ears that look somewhat like the continent of Africa.

  • African elephants are keystone species, meaning they play a critical role in their ecosystem. 

  • An elephant's trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things – especially a potential meal. The trunk alone contains about 40,000 muscles!

  • Elephants are matriarchal, meaning they live in female-led groups. The matriarch is usually the biggest and oldest. Adult males, called bulls, tend to roam on their own. 

  • Both male and female African elephants have tusks, which are continuously growing teeth. These tusks are used to dig for dood and water and strip bark from trees.

Situated in an area that was once the ancient ‘Ivory Route' linking Mozambique and Zululand, Tembe Elephant Park is renowned for having the largest elephants in Africa – and the planet! The park consists mainly of closed woodland but offers a great diversity of vegetation, lying within a transition area between tropical and sub-tropical forms.

Elephant facts:

  • African elephants are slightly larger than their Asian cousins, and can be identified by their larger ears that look somewhat like the continent of Africa.

  • African elephants are keystone species, meaning they play a critical role in their ecosystem. 

  • An elephant's trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things – especially a potential meal. The trunk alone contains about 40,000 muscles!

  • Elephants are matriarchal, meaning they live in female-led groups. The matriarch is usually the biggest and oldest. Adult males, called bulls, tend to roam on their own. 

  • Both male and female African elephants have tusks, which are continuously growing teeth. These tusks are used to dig for dood and water and strip bark from trees.

This camera is set on the banks of the mighty Olifants River near the Naledi Game Lodge. The river flows northwards then eastwards on its way to join the Limpopo before flowing into the Indian Ocean. Watch for crocodile and hippos that are regularly seen in the river and elephant and giraffe graze on the banks and crossing the river. Other animals which frequent the riverbanks include baboons, waterbuck, bushbuck, impalas, storks, herons and owls.

Facts:

  • The Nile Crocodiles, Africa's largest crocodilians, can reach a maximum size of about 20 feet and can weigh up to 1,650 pounds. Average sizes, though, are more in the range of 16 feet and 500 pounds. 

  • Large crocodiles swallow stones, known as gastroliths. These act as ballast, helping them to balance their body underwater.

  • Baboons are the world's largest monkeys, weighing the same as a human child.

  • Baboons are very social creatures. Groups of baboons are called troops, and a troop can contain dozens to hundreds of members. The largest troops have up to 300 members, according to the African Wildlife Federation. Troops groom, sleep and protect each other. 

Let's spend some time visiting the Mpala Research Center, situated in the highlands of central Kenya. This region is home to an estimated 550 bird and 100 mammal species. 

Facts:

  • To stay cool in the blistering heat, hippos spend most of their days in rivers and lakes. Their eyes, nose and ears are located on the top of their head, which means they can see and breathe whilst submerged in the water. See how many you can spot in the watering hole!

  • Grevy's zebras are the largest zebra species, and have thicker stripes and larger ears than other zebras. They prefer hot, dry regions and can often be seen on the open plains with other grazing animals such as wildebeest, ostriches and antelopes.
  • While Nile crocodiles' diet consists mostly of fish, they'll eat nearly anything that crosses their path, including zebras and gazelles. With the average adult measuring 16 feet in length and weighing 500 pounds, they truly are a sight to behold!

Look for:

  • Grevy's zebras

  • Elephants

  • Hippos

  • Giraffes

  • Leopards

  • Nile crocodiles

  • Gazelles

GRACE Center, located in a remote area adjacent to the Tayna Nature Reserve, plays a critical role in protecting gorillas. The habitat is home to 8% of the remaining wild population (around 300 gorillas). Other endangered wildlife such as chimpanzees and okapi also call this place home. 

Grauer gorilla facts:

  • Grauer’s gorillas live only in the remote forests of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in Central Africa.

  • Grauer's gorillas (formerly called eastern lowland gorillas) are the largest subspecies of gorilla.

  • Reaching up to 550 pounds in weight as adults, they are the world's largest primate.

  • They are similar to mountain gorillas but have shorter fur, narrower faces and rounder nostrils.

  • Grauer’s gorillas are largely herbivorous but have been seen eating ants and other insects.

  • They live in family groups led by the dominant male silverback.

  • During the day spend their time feeding and resting.

  • They build new sleeping nests each night.

  • Grauer's gorillas are threatened by the lack of legal protection for their habitat.

  • Grauer gorillas and humans share sharing 98% of their genetic code.

Meet the gorillas and learn about their lives and distinct personalities:

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Naked Mole Rats

Facts:

  • Naked mole-rats are pink, nearly hairless subterranean rodents.

  • They are the only true eusocial mammals; similar to ants and bees the colony members have specialized tasks and there's a Queen.

  • They live in underground burrows in eastern Africa. 

  • They live long lives: up to 32 years.

  • They don't need a lot of oxygen to live.

  • Typical individuals are 3-4 " long and weigh 30-35 grams

  • Queens are larger and may weigh well over 50 grams (1.8 oz), the largest reaching 80 grams (2.8 oz).

  • Their eyes are quite small, and their visual acuity is poor. Their legs are thin and short; however, they are great at moving underground.

  • They can move backward as fast as they can move forward. T

  • Their large, protruding teeth are used to dig and their lips are sealed just behind the teeth, preventing soil from filling their mouths while digging.

  • They have huge and highly differentiate jaw muscles that make up 25% of their muscle mass.

  • Naked mole-rats feel no pain when they are exposed to acid or capsaicin. 

  • Naked mole-rats have a high resistance to cancer and tumors

Destination: Asia

  • Asia is Earth's largest and most populous continent, with an area of 17.2 million square miles and a population of 4.6 billion people!

  • This continent is bounded by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the east, the Indian Ocean to the south, the Red Sea (as well as the inland seas of the Atlantic Ocean—the Mediterranean and the Black to the southwest, and Europe to the west. 

  • Its population is unevenly distributed, mainly because of climatic factors. There is a concentration of population in western Asia as well as great concentrations in the Indian subcontinent and the eastern half of China.

  • Asia has the highest average elevation of the continents and contains the tallest peak in the world, Mount Everest, which reaches an elevation of 29,035 feet AND the lowest place on Earth’s land surface, the Dead Sea, measured in the mid-2010s at about 1,410 feet below sea level.

  • This continent is the birthplace of all the world’s major religions—Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism —and of many minor ones. (Not sure if this is one we include, but thought it was interesting!)

  • Asia shows a notable diversity of habitats, with significant variations in rainfall, altitude, topography, temperature and geological history, which is reflected in its richness of animal life.

The baby and toddler pandas of Happiness Village Garden play, nap, eat, and grow at the Shenshuping Gengda Panda Center!

Facts:

  • The giant panda's distinct black-and-white markings have two functions: camouflage and communication.  Most of the panda - its face, neck, belly, rump - is white to help it hide in snowy habitats. The arms and legs are black, helping it to hide in shade. 

  • Giant pandas spend 10-16 hours a day feeding, mainly on bamboo. Pandas need at least 2 different bamboo species in their range to avoid starvation

  • Like other bears, pandas can swim! They do not, however, hibernate, as they are unable to store energy over long periods of time

  • Although they once roamed over a large portion of Asia, scientists currently estimate the population of wild Giant Pandas at only 1,864, making Giant Pandas a seriously vulnerable species. There are approximately 600 in captivity in panda centers, zoos and wild life parks.

Destination: South America

  • About 550 million years ago, it is believed that the South American continent was part of the supercontinent called Gondwana which includes  Africa, Australia, and Antartica, the Indian subcontinent and Arabian peninsula. It broke apart 180 million years ago.

  • There are 12 countries in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

  • Total Population: 428 million people

  • Great civilizations like the Incas, Chavin, Paracas and Nazca civilizations have lived here.

  • Some indigenous tribes have no contact with modern civilization.

  • More than 300 languages are spoken in South America

  • Largest city: Sao Paulo, Brazil 

  • La Paz, Bolivia is the highest capital in the world at 11,942 feet (3.640 meters)

  • South America is 6,890,000 square miles (17,840,000 square kilometers). 

  • The Amazon rainforest is the world's most biodiverse place on the planet

  • The world's highest uninterrupted waterfall, Angel Falls is in Venezuela.

  • The Andes Mountains is the world's longest mountain range

  • The Atamaca Desert is considered as the driest place on Earth; some parts of it have not received rain since recordings started.

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Machu Picchu is a15th-century citadel located in southern Peru. It's a breathtaking symbol of the Incan Empire, with impressive architectural achievements sitting high atop the Andes mountain range. 

Facts:

  • Most archeologists believe that Machu Picchu was constructed as a royal estate for the Inca emperor Pachacuti or a secret ceremonial center. Because it was hidden on a mountain, the Spanish conquest didn't find the area and thus it serves as the most well-preserved Inca city and an archeological gem. 

  • In the Quechua Indian language, "Machu Picchu" means "Old Mountain."

  • Machu Picchu was built in the classical Inca style, with polished dry-stone walls that were so well built that not even a knife blade can fit in between stones. 

  • Its three primary structures are the Intihuatana, the Temple of the Sun, and the Room of the Three Windows. Machu Picchu was an astronomical observatory, and its sacred Intihuatana stone accurately indicates two equinoxes. In total, there are more than 150 buildings that make up the site. 

  • Machu Picchu is located in a cloud forest, right in between the Andes and the Amazon rainforest. Due to this unique climate, Machu Picchu is lush and green, often encompassed by low hanging clouds and mist. There is a wide variety of subtropical species of flowers and brightly colored birds that you can see there!

  • In 1981, Machu Picchu was declared a Peruvian Historic Sanctuary, and in 1983 a UNESCO World heritage Site.